Oak Hardwood Flooring: Red Versus White

From ease of maintenance and appeal to an increased home value, the benefits of installing hardwood floors should be easy to see. Of course, deciding to install wood floors is not the only decision you will need to make, since there are many types of woods and finishes to choose from, as well. Today, more and more people are choosing between different oaks, such as red and white oak for their hardwood floors. This guide will help you learn the differences between them both.

Durability/Hardness

Obviously, you want a hardwood that will stand the test of time. Fortunately, both red and white oak are excellent options to consider for durability and hardness.

Many experts believe white oak is a bit harder than red, meaning it can withstand more weight and pressure. However, the differences are very slight. White oak has a Janka hardness of 1,330 while red oak's Janka hardness measures a little under 1,300.

Many people choose the wood with the highest Janka rating, but there are many other factors to consider when choosing between oak, such as the red or white oaks, or another type of wood.

Color/Appeal

The overall look you are hoping to achieve will also come into play when deciding between red and white oak floors. Again, the variations are slight, but it is important to consider each option carefully, especially since the woods look different in different types of light.

To get started, consider bringing a few red and white oak samples to your home to sit in the room where the hardwood floors will be installed. This will allow you to see the differences in color at various times of the day while the light changes.

Basically, red oak has a pinkish or even light reddish tint. You may think white oak will be white or very light in color, but it actually has a darker hue that is brown or even dark yellow in color.

Grains/Detailing

The grain adds a lot of detail to your floors and home in general, but you may want more or less detail depending on your taste.

Red oak offers a stronger grain, adding a lot of texture and detailing to your home. This is a great option for homes designed in a more traditional or rustic manner. If you prefer something more clean and modern, you may want to consider the smooth look of white oak that has less grain.

Contact a company, like TLV Flooring Solutions, for more help.

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